SOCIAL CARE PRACTICES FROM UK? WHY?

Christopher Booker says it like it is  – yet again. The first part of his article which refers to water wastage while the UK public is urged to save water is right on the money. It is quite absurd that the UK  – renowned for its damp, rainy climate  – is always at the top of the list when it comes to  water shortages. Why do we not hear the same cries from other drier countries in the EU? It has to come down to wastage and leakage.

However, the second part of the article struck me as being of particular relevance to an island that copies and pastes and adopts so much legislation from the adjacent isle. CB refers to the fact that many of the victims in the recent UK child abuse case were in council care. He goes on to quote stats and declares that this latest case appears to confirm that many of the 10,000 now being taken into care each year by English social workers are at more risk of serious harm than they ever were from the families from which they were removed.

There appears to be a mindset within government that we should turn to the UK for guidance in social care matters. Why else would we have adopted half a million pounds’ worth of surveillance systems and new ‘working practices’ involving the import of workers if we didn’t consider the system to be superior in some way. Of course ‘we’ didn’t choose it, did we? Our money was used for this purpose without consulting us. However, when we see how lacking the UK system can sometimes be then it would seem essential that we are given more information about why the new working practices were introduced in secret and whether they really are suited to our needs.

Do our ministers blindly follow recommendations to adopt legislation and new measures?

Abused girls paid price for ‘child care’ Much of the response to the case of the teenage girls in Rochdale who were sexually abused by Pakistani and Afghan men has focused on whether this horrifying episode should be discussed in terms of the racial origins of the perpetrators. Rather less attention has been paid to the revelation that many of the 47 girls involved in the case were in council care, under our “child protection” system. Ofsted, reponsible for monitoring child care, is reported to be investigating claims that a great many more girls in care in the area have been abused, not a few of them in “sole” care in private homes run by companies that charge councils up to £250,000 a year for each child, 10 times the annual fee for Eton.

Ofsted admits that 631 children in care have been the victims of actual or suspected sexual abuse in the past five years, 187 in the past 10 months alone. This latest case appears to confirm that many of the 10,000 now being taken into care each year by English social workers are at more risk of serious harm than they ever were from the families from which they were removed. Inevitably, this prompts the question – who is in a position to protect these children from the social workers? Of all the scandals clustering round our dysfunctional “child protection” system, this may be the most obviously shocking – but there are plenty more. So far off the rails has this entire system gone that it is hard to imagine how it can ever be corrected. The only people with the power to call it to account are the politicians. But with the shining exception of John Hemming MP, they seem as oblivious to what is really going on as they are to so much else.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/9261122/Keeping-the-country-short-of-water-is-now-government-and-EU-policy.html

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